Meet the Panel

Guest Panelists

Taylor Weech

Taylor is a Spokane-born radio host, writer, artist, and organizer. She won Spokane’s Peirone Philanthropy prize in 2010, at 20 years of age, and from 2012-2017 hosted a weekly talk radio show on KYRS-FM, Praxis, that discussed action-based politics and organizing. She has been described as a spark in the community, and it’s easy to see why:

She co-founded the Love & Outrage collective which merges the worlds of art and activism, Taylor is also an activist with the Peace & Justice Action League of Spokane (PJALS), where she serves as vice-chair of the Steering Committee.

In 2016, she exhibited, “Settled: Whiteness from the Wild West to the West Bank,” which featured mixed-media focusing on settler-colonialism in North America and in Palestine.  She published a chapbook of poetry on mass extinction, “The Last and the Lasting.” She was Eastern Washington University’s Activist-in-Residence in winter 2017, and currently works at Spark Central, a creative learning center focused on technology and imaginative programming.

 

Moderator

Marina Treichel

For many years, Marina was a member of a women’s editorial team in the Public Access TV in Berlin, and later produced films with her own team. She has been a guest moderator at Black International Cinema Berlin, in partnership with the Commissioner for Integration, Berlin; she has also moderated conversations regarding social issues and political reform in Sweden and Germany.

Angela Jones

Angela Jones has over 20 years in education as a former Spokane Public Schools HR director and current Chief of Staff at EWU. Jones works tirelessly as an advocate for social justice. She has served on boards and committees such as the YWCA Board, Unity in the Community, WSU Women’s Advisory Committee, and the Spokane Public Schools Diversity Council.

Jones has presented at events including Future Teachers and Leaders of Color Conference, Washington State University’s Black Women’s Caucus Tea, Spokane Youth and Justice Forum, Gonzaga Prep’s Diversity Week, and Gonzaga University’s International Day of Tolerance. She has served as diversity chairwoman of the Student Bar Association, and as a member of the Multicultural Law Caucus.

She is a member of the WA State Minority and Justice Commission and Zeta Phi Beta Sorority. Locally, she is a member of the Spokane Police Advisory team and faith alliance that is reviewing use of force data, Board Chair for Operation Healthy Family, and volunteers on various committees for Spokane Public Schools.

She holds a J.D. from Gonzaga University.

Amina Fields

Amina’s diverse experiences laid the foundation of empathy for her legal practice.  She escaped from Vietnam as a refugee at age 4.  Amina and her father settled in Fullerton, California, where they were reunited with her mother and her sister five years later.  

She served for 10 years in the United States Air Force (USAF).  While an active duty member of the military, she earned her bachelor’s degree in Legal Studies from the University of Maryland University College. In 2013, she received her Juris Doctor from the University of the District of Columbia, David A. Clarke School of Law.  As a law student she was the president of the Asian Pacific American Law Student Association. She also represented clients in the David A. Clarke School of Law Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic and Community Development Law Clinic.

Mrs. Fields is involved with various organizations that advocate and support the immigrant and refugee community. She was a volunteer attorney for Catholic Charities of Spokane Immigrant and Refugee Services from 2014 to 2015. She is active with the Asian Pacific Islander Coalition of Spokane through organizing voter registration drives and moderating candidate forums. She also assists the local Vietnamese American Senior Association. As the Chair of the Board of Directors for Refugee Connection of Spokane, a Commissioner of the Spokane Human Rights Commission, and a solo practitioner that focuses her practice on immigration law, she aims to unite families and protect the human rights of the vulnerable communities.

Mariah McKay

Mariah McKay is currently a public health educator at the Spokane Regional Health District. She was one of the youngest graduates of Leadership Spokane’s Class of 2010 and currently serves on the board of the University District representing the “Community At Large” in addition to writing a monthly column for The Inlander.

In 2016, she was voted Spokane’s “Best Tireless Community Volunteer” as part of The Inlander’s Best Of the Inland Northwest series. McKay has been recognized for her community efforts, including: “Best Twenty Something Making a Difference in 2014”; “Organizer of the Year 2014,” from Main Street Alliance; and a 2016 Gold Addy Award for the Walk Bike Bus Spokane Campaign from the Spokane Chapter of the American Advertising Association.

She is the founder of the Spokane Shrinking Violet Society and active member of the Spokane Area Chapter of NOW in addition to serving as a leader on the Fuse Spokane Local Council. In her previous role at Washington Community Action Network, McKay worked on campaigns to bring affordable healthcare to everyone, advance tax reform, broaden dental access and take action toward immigration reform.

Currently McKay is involved in developing cohousing in Spokane, a model for community-oriented neighborhoods. “In a society that’s individually oriented we must overcome economic and social barriers to creating community. This empowers people to address issues through organizing.”

Mimi Marinucci

Mimi Marinucci has taught at EWU’s Philosophy and Women’s & Gender Studies department since 2000, where her teaching and research are focused on feminism, philosophy, and feminist philosophy, particularly as represented in popular culture. She is especially interested in popular culture as a medium for the production and dissemination of knowledge about who we are as women and men.

Marinucci also explores tensions between second-wave feminism and traditional lesbian and gay studies and shows ways in which queer theory offers a paradigm for understanding gender, sex, and sexuality and develops solidarity between those interested in feminist theory and those pursuing lesbian and gay rights.

Her first book, Feminism is Queer: The Intimate Connection between Queer and Feminist Theory (Zed Books, 2010) received a Choice Outstanding Academic Title award. Marinucci is also the editor of Jane Austen and Philosophy in the Great Authors and Philosophy series (Rowman and Littlefield, 2016). She has been awarded with the EWU President’s Award and Professor of the Year award (2011), and she was awarded the Best of the West Plains EWU Teacher of the Year (2012). In addition to publishing numerous articles in journals and books, Marinucci also founded and self published several issues of “Wave 2.5: A Feminist Zine,” a two-time Utne Independent Press Award nominee (2005, 2009).